Mobsea Logo
Home

An Improved Phonograph

Thomas Edison

<
^
>

An Improved Phonograph

Edisons wife, Mary, died on August 9, 1884, possibly from a brain tumor. Edison remarried to Mina Miller on February 24, 1886, and, with his wife, moved into a large mansion named Glenmont in West Orange, New Jersey. Edisons children from his first marriage were distanced from their fathers new life, as Edison and Mina had their own family Madeleine, born on 1888, Charles on 1890, and Theodore on 1898. Unlike Mary, who was sickly and often remained at home, and was also deferential to her husbands wishes, Mina was an active woman, devoting much time to community groups, social functions, and charities, as well as trying to improve her husbands often careless personal habits.In 1887, Edison had built a new, larger laboratory in West Orange, New Jersey. The facility included a machine shop, phonograph and photograph departments, a library, and ancillary buildings for metallurgy, chemistry, woodworking, and galvanometer testings.While Edison had neglected further work on the phonograph, others had moved forward to improve it. In particular, Chichester Bell and Charles Sumner Tainter developed an improved machine that used a wax cylinder and a floating stylus, which they called a graphophone. They sent representatives to Edison to discuss a possible partnership on the machine, but Edison refused to collaborate with them, feeling that the phonograph was his invention alone. With this competition, Edison was stirred into action and resumed his work on the phonograph in 1887. Edison eventually adopted methods similar to Bell and Tainters in his own phonograph.

The phonograph was initially marketed as a business dictation machine. Entrepreneur Jesse H. Lippincott acquired control of most of the phonograph companies, including Edisons, and set up the North American Phonograph Co. in 1888. The business did not prove profitable, and when Lippincott fell ill, Edison took over the management. In 1894, the North American Phonograph Co. went into bankruptcy, a move which allowed Edison to buy back the rights to his invention. In 1896, Edison started the National Phonograph Co. with the intent of making phonographs for home amusement. Over the years, Edison made improvements to the phonograph and to the cylinders which were played on them, the early ones being made of wax. Edison introduced an unbreakable cylinder record, named the Blue Amberol, at roughly the same time he entered the disc phonograph market in 1912. The introduction of an Edison disc was in reaction to the overwhelming popularity of discs on the market in contrast to cylinders. Touted as being superior to the competitions records, the Edison discs were designed to be played only on Edison phonographs, and were cut laterally as opposed to vertically. The success of the Edison phonograph business, though, was always hampered by the companys reputation of choosing lower quality recording acts. In the 1920s, competition from radio caused business to sour, and the Edison disc business ceased production in 1929.


<
^
>

Legacy
Starting fresh
Leisure time
Starting a business starting a family
An Improved Phonograph
Telegraph Work
Menlo Park
Telephone
One last grand experiment
Motion Pictures
Serving the nation
Electric light
More ...


Test your English Language
Natural Healthy Summer Foods
Eating Secrets to Help You Lose Weight
Bhai Dooj Celebration
Marrie Curie
Dhirubhai Ambani
Rules to play Cross Country Running
Benefits of Cashew
Weird and wild cutting edge Security Threats
Easy ways to Make Money Quickly
Benefits of Cantaloupe
Weird Books
Sunil Gavaskar
Creepiest Clouds On Earth
Parachute Activity
Football Players
Pregnancy Health Care
President Of India
Prevent Dengue