dog breeds

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Dog Breeds

The term domestic dog is generally used for both domesticated and feral varieties.
1. Affenpinscher
The breed is German in origin and dates back to the seventeenth century. The name is derived from the German Affe (ape, monkey). The breed predates and is
ancestral to the Griffon Bruxellois (Brussels Griffon) and Miniature Schnauzer.
Dogs of the Affenpinscher type have been known since about 1600, but these were somewhat larger, about 12 to 13 inches, and came in colors of gray, fawn, black and tan, gray and tan, and also red. White feet and chest were also common. The breed was created to be a ratter, working to remove rodents from kitchens, granaries, and stables.
Banana Joe V Tani Kazari (AKA Joe), a five-year-old Affenpinscher, was named Best in Show at the 2013 Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show in New York City. This win is
notable since it is the first time this breed has won Best in Show at Westminster.
2. Afghan Hound
"The Afghan Hound is tall, standing in height 24 29 inches and weighing 45 60 pounds. The coat may be any colour, but white markings, particularly on the head, are discouraged; many individuals have a black facial mask. A specimen may have facial hair that looks like a Fu Manchu moustache. The moustache is called ""mandarins."" Some Afghan Hounds are almost white, but parti-colour hounds (white with islands of red or black) are not acceptable and may indicate impure breeding. The long, fine-textured coat requires considerable care and grooming. The long topknot and the shorter-haired saddle on the back of the dog are distinctive features of the Afghan Hound coat. The high hipbones and unique small ring on the end of the tail are also characteristics of the breed. The temperament of the typical Afghan Hound can be aloof and dignified, but happy and clownish when it's playing. This breed, as is the case with many sighthounds, has a high prey drive and may not get along with small animals. The Afghan Hounds' reasoning skills have made it a successful competitor in dog agility trials as well as an intuitive therapy dog and companion. Genomic studies have pointed to the Afghan Hound as one of the oldest of dog breeds. The breed has a reputation among some dog trainers of having a relatively slow ""obedience intelligence"" as defined by author Stanley Coren in The Intelligence of Dogs. Although seldom used today for hunting in Europe and America where they are popular, Afghan hounds are frequent participants in lure coursing events and are also popular in the sport of conformation showing."
3. AiredaleTerrier
"The Airedale is the largest of the British Terriers. They weigh 25?30 kilograms (55?66 lb) and have a height at the withers of 58?61 centimetres (23?24 in) for dogs, with females slightly smaller. The American Kennel Club standard specifies a smaller dog. Larger Airedales, up to 55 kilograms (121 lb) can be found in North America. They are often called ""Oorangs."" This was the name of a kennel in Ohio in the early 1900s. The Airedale has a medium-length black and tan coat with a harsh topcoat and a soft undercoat. They are an alert and energetic breed, ""not aggressive but fearless.""It has been claimed that the large ""hunting"" type or Oorang Airedales are more game than the smaller ""show"" type Airedales. The large type are usually used for big game hunting and as family guardians or as pets, but usually do poorly in AKC conformation shows. This larger type is also significantly more prone to Hip Dysplasia than the standard Airedales."
4. Akita
As a spitz breed, the appearance of the Akita reflects cold weather adaptations essential to their original function. The Akita is a substantial breed for its height with heavy bones.stic physical traits of the breed include a large, bear-like head with erect, triangular ears set at a slight angle following the arch of the neck.Additionally, the eyes of the Akita are small, dark, deeply set and triangular in shape.Akitas have thick double coats, and tight, well knuckled cat-like feet. Their tails are carried over the top of the back in a gentle or double curl down the loin. Mature American type males measure typically 26?28 inches (66?71 cm) at the withers and weigh between 100?130 lb (45?59 kg).Mature females typically measure 24?26 inches (61?66 cm) and weigh between 70?100 lb (32?45 kg). The Japanese type, as stated in the breed standards, are a little smaller and lighter. Breed standards state that all dog breed coat colors are allowable in the American style Akita, including pinto, all types of brindle, solid white, black mask, white mask, self-colored mask, even differing colors of under coat and overlay (guard hairs).[30] This includes the common Shiba Inu coloring pattern known as Urajiro.[citation needed] The Japanese style Akitas, as per the breed standards, are restricted to red, fawn, sesame, brindle, pure white, all with "Urajiro" markings i.e., whitish coat on the sides of the muzzle, on the cheeks, on the underside of jaw, neck, chest, body and tail and on the inside of the legs.
5. Alaskan Malamute
The American Kennel Club (AKC) breed standard describes a natural range of size, with a desired size of 23 inches (58 cm) tall and 75 pounds (34 kg) for females, 25 inches (64 cm) tall and 85 pounds (39 kg) for males. Heavier individuals (90 lb (41 kg)) and dogs smaller than 75 pounds (34 kg) are commonly seen. There is often a marked size difference between males and females. Weights upwards of 100 pounds (45 kg) are also seen.[1] The coat of the Alaskan Malamute is a double coat. The undercoat has an oily and woolly texture and can be as thick as two inches.[1] The outer guard coat is coarse and stands off the body
6. American Bulldog
The American bulldog is a stocky, well built, strong-looking dog, with a large head and a muscular build. Its coat is short and generally smooth. The breed is a light to moderate shedder; however, they should be brushed on regular basis. Colors, while historically predominantly white with patches of red, black, or brindle, have grown in recent years to include many color patterns including black, red, brown, fawn, and all shades of brindle. The color conformation is quite varied, but solid black or any degree of merle is considered a cosmetic fault, and a blue color is a disqualification by the NKC Breed Standard. Black pigmentation on the nose and eye rims is preferred, with only some pink allowed. Eye color is usually brown, but heterochromia also occurs, although considered a cosmetic fault. American Bulldogs can be droolers; this varies and is more prevalent in the Bully type, which is generally a larger, heavier dog with a shorter muzzle. Standard or Performance types are generally more athletic with longer muzzles and a more square head. It is important to note that many modern American Bulldogs are a combination of the two types usually termed hybrid. In general, American Bulldogs weigh between 27 to 54 kg (60 to 120 lb) and are 52 to 70 cm (20 to 28 in) at the withers, but have been known to greatly exceed these dimensions, especially in the out of standard, nonworking stock.
7. American Cocker Spaniel
The American Cocker Spaniel is a breed of sporting dog. It is a spaniel type dog that is closely related to the English Cocker Spaniel; the two breeds diverged during the 20th century due to differing breed standards in America and the UK. In the United States, the breed is usually called the Cocker Spaniel, while elsewhere in the world, it is called the American Cocker Spaniel in order to differentiate between it and its English cousin. The word cocker is commonly held to stem from their use to hunt woodcock in England, while spaniel is thought to be derived from the type's origins in Spain. The first spaniel in America came across with the Mayflower in 1620, but it was not until 1878 that the first Cocker Spaniel was registered with the American Kennel Club (AKC). A national breed club was set up three years later and the dog considered to be the father of the modern breed, Ch. Obo II, was born around this time. By the 1920s the English and American varieties of Cocker had become noticeably different and in 1946 the AKC recognised the English type as a separate breed. It was not until 1970 that The Kennel Club in the UK recognised the American Cocker Spaniel as being separate from the English type. The American Cocker was the most popular breed in the United States during the 1940s and 1950s and again during the 1980s, reigning for a total of 18 years. They have also won the best in show title at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show on four occasions, and have been linked to the President of the United States on several occasions, with owners including Richard Nixon and Harry S. Truman. The breed is the smallest of the sporting dogs recognised by the AKC, and its distinctly shaped head makes it immediately recognisable. In addition, there are some marked differences between it and its English relative. It is a happy breed with average working intelligence, although by being bred to a show standard it is no longer an ideal working dog. Members of the breed suffer from a wide variety of health ailments including problems with their hearts, eyes and ears.
8. American Eskimo
The American Eskimo Dog is a breed of companion dog originating in Germany. The American Eskimo is a member of the Spitz family. Despite its name and appearance, the American Eskimo dog is not from Alaska; the dog's heritage is traced back to Northern Europe. The breed's progenitors were German Spitz, but due to anti-German prejudice during the First World War, it was renamed American Eskimo Dog. Although modern American Eskimos have been exported as German Spitz Gross (or Mittel, depending on the dog's height), the breed standards are actually significantly different. In addition to serving as a watchdog and companion, the American Eskimo dog also achieved a high degree of popularity in the 1930s and 1940s United States as a circus performer. There are three size varieties of the American Eskimo breed, the toy, miniature and the standard. They share a common resemblance with Japanese Spitz and Samoyed dog. Miniature American Eskimos, with their high intelligence and inquisitive nature, will love to investigate. If they find something very interesting they will often want their owner or handler to investigate as well, and will at times, not let the matter go until the person complies. You will often find this behavior when it comes to children; for instance, if a baby or child is crying, the American Eskimo will want you to see what the problem is and will not stop worrying until you do. The American Eskimo being so tuned in is one of the characteristics that makes them a desirable breed around children.
9. American Foxhound
American Foxhound to be about 21?25 in (53?64 cm) tall to the withers, and weigh anywhere between 65?75 lb (29?34 kg), many of them are larger in structure (especially the show strains), with males standing 26?29 in (66?74 cm) and females 25?28 in (64?71 cm) and smaller in weight, typically between 45?65 lb (20?29 kg). For years it was traditional to feed Foxhounds on a diet of dog bread, a variation on cornbread. The legs of a Foxhound are very long and straight-boned. The foxhound's chest is rather narrow. It has a long muzzle, and a large, domed skull. The ears are wide and low-set. The eyes are hazel or brown, and are large and wide-set.
10. American Water Spaniel
The American Water Spaniel, (often abbreviated to AWS), is a breed of spaniel which is one of a small number of breeds originating in the United States. Developed in the state of Wisconsin during the 19th century from a number of other breeds, including the Irish and English Water Spaniels. The breed was saved by Dr. Fred J. Pfeifer, who set up the breed club and standard, and whose work led to recognition for the breed by the United Kennel Club, and later, the American Kennel Club. While they are the state dog of Wisconsin, they remain a rare breed. They are medium sized dog, and have a double layered coat, which comes in a variety of brown related shades. A versatile hunting dog, they are also suitable for apartment life due to work by breeders to develop a breed with an even temperament. The AWS may have been involved in the development of the Boykin Spaniel.


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