dog breeds

Confusing Words in English Language. Free Reading..

Dog Breeds

The term domestic dog is generally used for both domesticated and feral varieties.
81. Jack Russel Terrier
The Jack Russell Terrier is a small terrier that has its origins in fox hunting; it is principally white-bodied and smooth, rough or broken-coated. It is commonly confused with the Parson Russell terrier (see the American Kennel Club) and the Russell terrier, which is a shorter-legged, stockier variety. (Within the F?d?ration Cynologique Internationale, the Russell terrier is also known as Jack Russell terrier.) The term Jack Russell is commonly misapplied to other small white terriers. The Jack Russell is a broad type, with a size range of 10?15 inches (25?38 cm). The Parson Russell is limited only to a middle range with a standard size of 12?14 inches (30?36 cm), while the Russell terrier is smaller at 8?12 inches (20?30 cm). Each breed has different physical proportions according to the standards of their breed clubs. The Jack Russell is an energetic breed that relies on a high level of exercise and stimulation and is relatively free from serious health complaints. Originating from dogs bred and used by Reverend John Russell in the early 19th century, it has similar origins to the modern Fox terrier. It has gone through several changes over the years corresponding to different use and breed standards set by kennel clubs. Recognition by kennel clubs for the Jack Russell breed has been opposed by the breed's parent societies ? which resulted in the breeding and recognition of the Parson Russell terrier. Jack Russells have appeared many times in film, television and print with several historical dogs of note.
82. Japanese Spaniel
The Japanese Chin (Japanese: ?, chin), also known as the Japanese Spaniel,is the dog of Japanese royalty. A lap dog and companion dog, this toy breed has a distinctive heritage Japanese Chin stand about 20 to 27 cm (8 to 11 in) in height at the withers. Weight can vary from a low of 1.4 kg (3 lb) to a high of 6.8 kg (15 lb), with an average of 3.2?4.1 kg (7?9 lb) being the most common. The American Kennel Club and the F?d?ration Cynologique Internationale give no weight requirement for the Chin. The distinctive Oriental expression is characterized by the large broad head, large wide-set eyes, short broad muzzle, ear feathering, and the evenly patterned facial markings. The coat is low maintenance, long, and smooth/silky to the touch. The coat is distinctively black & white or red & white in color and have variations in color intensity (lemon & white, mahogany & white, etc.). As of November 11, 2011, the colors not listed in the breed standard[2] are grounds for disqualification in competitions.
83. Keeshond
The Keeshond is a medium-sized dog with a plush two-layer coat of silver and black fur with a ruff and a curled tail. It originated in Germany, and its closest relatives are the German spitzes such as the Gro
84. Kerry Blue Terrier
The Kerry Blue Terrier is a breed of dog. In Ireland it is often called the Irish Blue Terrier. Originally bred to control vermin including rats, rabbits, badgers, foxes, otters and hares, over time the Kerry became a general working dog used for a variety of jobs including herding cattle and sheep, and as a guard dog. Today the Kerry has spread around the world as a companion and working dog. Despite winning Crufts (the most important UK dog show) in 2000, it remains an unfashionable breed,[2] still distinctly uncommon, but not as threatened as some of the other terrier breeds such as Skye Terrier, Sealyham Terrier, and Dandie Dinmont Terrier. Some characteristics of the Kerry Blue Terrier include a long head, flat skull, deep chest, and a soft wavy-to-curly coat that comes in several shades of blue, the general term outside this breed being progressive grey. Puppies are born black; the blue appears gradually as the puppy grows older, usually up to 2 years of age. The ideal Kerry should be 18-1/2 inches at the withers for a male, slightly less for the female. The most desirable weight for a fully developed male is from 33?40 pounds, females weighing proportionately less.
85. Komondor
The Komondor, Canis familiaris pastoralis villosus hungaricus, (in Hungarian the plural for komondor is komondorok, not used in English) is a large, white-coloured Hungarian breed of livestock guardian dog with a long, corded coat. Sometimes referred to as 'mop dogs,' the Komondor is a long-established[3] powerful dog breed that has a natural guardian instinct to guard livestock and other property. The Komondor was brought to Europe by the Cumans and it was mentioned for the first time in 1544 in a Hungarian codex.[3] The Komondor breed has been declared one of Hungary
86. Kuvasz
The Kuvasz (Hungarian pronunciation: [?kuv?s]), (the Hungarian plural form, Kuvaszok is not used in English) is an ancient breed of a livestock dog of Hungarian origin. Mention of the breed can be found in old Hungarian texts. It has historically been used as a royal guard dog, or to guard livestock, but has been increasingly found in homes as a pet over the last seventy years. The Kuvasz is a large dog with a dense double, odorless coat which is white in color and can range from wavy to straight in texture. Although the fur is white, the Kuvasz
87. Labradoodle
A Labradoodle is a crossbred dog created by crossing the Labrador Retriever and the Standard, Miniature or Toy Poodle. The term first appeared in 1955, but was not popularized until 1988, when the mix began to be used as an allergen-free guide dog. Currently, they are not considered a breed by any major fancier and breeder organization. Not all Labradoodles are hypoallergenic, but it is a quality that many look for and appreciate in this breed of dog. Since there is no real hypoallergenic dog, the term is often used loosely. Because the Labradoodle is a hybrid and not a breed, puppies do not have consistently predictable characteristics.1 While most Labradoodles have some common traits, their appearance and behavioral characteristics remain, to some extent, unpredictable. As such, Labradoodles' hair can be anywhere from wiry to soft, and may be straight, wavy, or curly.1 Straight-coated Labradoodles are said to have hair coats, wavy-coated dogs have fleece coats, and curly-coated dogs have wool coats. Many Labradoodles do shed, although the coat usually sheds less and has less dog odor than that of a Labrador Retriever. Like most Labrador Retrievers and Poodles, Labradoodles are generally friendly, energetic and good with families and children.1 Labradoodles often display an affinity for water and strong swimming ability from their parent breeds. Their parent breeds are both amongst the world's most intelligent dog breeds.
88. Labrador Retriever
The Labrador Retriever, also known as simply Labrador or Lab, is one of several kinds of retrievers, a type of gun dog. They are even-tempered and well-behaved around young children and the elderly. Labradors are athletic, playful, and the most popular breed of dog by registered ownership in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and the United States (since 1991). A favourite assistance dog breed in these and other countries, Labradors are frequently trained to aid people who are blind and people with autism, act as therapy dogs, and perform screening and detection work for law enforcement and other official agencies. They are prized as sporting and waterfowl hunting dogs.A few kennels breeding these grew up in England; at the same time a combination of sheep protection policy (Newfoundland) and rabies quarantine (England) led to their gradual demise in their country of origin. The first and second Earls of Malmesbury, who bred for duck shooting on his estate, and the 5th and 6th Dukes of Buccleuch, and youngest son Lord George William Montagu-Douglas-Scott, were instrumental in developing and establishing the modern Labrador breed in 19th century England. The dogs Avon (Buccleuch Avon) and Ned given by Malmesbury to assist the Duke of Buccleuch's breeding program in the 1880s are considered the ancestors of modern Labradors. The first St. John's dog was said to be brought to England in or around 1820; however, the breed's reputation had spread to England long before. There is a story that the Earl of Malmesbury saw a St. John's Dog on a fishing boat and immediately made arrangements with traders to have some of these dogs exported to England. These ancestors of the first labradors so impressed the Earl with their skill and ability for retrieving anything within the water and on shore that he devoted his entire kennel to developing and stabilizing the breed.
89. Lakeland Terrier
The Labrador Retriever, also known as simply Labrador or Lab, is one of several kinds of retrievers, a type of gun dog. They are even-tempered and well-behaved around young children and the elderly. Labradors are athletic, playful, and the most popular breed of dog by registered ownership in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and the United States (since 1991). A favourite assistance dog breed in these and other countries, Labradors are frequently trained to aid people who are blind and people with autism, act as therapy dogs, and perform screening and detection work for law enforcement and other official agencies. They are prized as sporting and waterfowl hunting dogs.A few kennels breeding these grew up in England; at the same time a combination of sheep protection policy (Newfoundland) and rabies quarantine (England) led to their gradual demise in their country of origin. The first and second Earls of Malmesbury, who bred for duck shooting on his estate, and the 5th and 6th Dukes of Buccleuch, and youngest son Lord George William Montagu-Douglas-Scott, were instrumental in developing and establishing the modern Labrador breed in 19th century England. The dogs Avon (Buccleuch Avon) and Ned given by Malmesbury to assist the Duke of Buccleuch's breeding program in the 1880s are considered the ancestors of modern Labradors. The first St. John's dog was said to be brought to England in or around 1820; however, the breed's reputation had spread to England long before. There is a story that the Earl of Malmesbury saw a St. John's Dog on a fishing boat and immediately made arrangements with traders to have some of these dogs exported to England. These ancestors of the first labradors so impressed the Earl with their skill and ability for retrieving anything within the water and on shore that he devoted his entire kennel to developing and stabilizing the breed.
90. Lhasa Apso
The Lhasa Apso is a non-sporting dog breed originating in Tibet. It was bred as an interior sentinel in the Buddhist monasteries, to alert the monks to any intruders who entered. Lhasa was the capital city of Tibet and apso is a word in the Tibetan language meaning bearded, so, Lhasa Apso simply means long-haired Lhasa dog. There are, however, some who claim that the word apso is a corruption of the Tibetan word rapso, meaning goat-like, which would make the equivalent translation wooly Lhasa dog. Male Lhasa Apsos should ideally be 10.75 inches (27.3 cm) at the withers and weigh about 14 to 18 pounds (6.4 to 8.2 kg). The females are slightly smaller, and weigh between 12 to 14 pounds (5.4 to 6.4 kg). The breed standard requires dark brown eyes and a black nose, although liver-colored lhasas have a brown nose. The texture of the coat is heavy, straight, hard, neither woolly nor silky, and very dense. They come in a wide variety of colors including black, white, red and gold with various shadings. Lhasas can be with or without dark tips at the ends of ears and beard. The tail should be carried well over the dog's back. The breed standard currently used by the American Kennel Club was approved on July 11, 1978.


Test your English Language
The Best Selling Cars in the World
Eating Secrets to Help You Lose Weight
Best Marwari Mehndi Designs
Highly Glamorous Buildings in the World
Best Peacock Mehndi Designs
Benefits of Kumquat fruit
Rajiv Gandhi
Most Crowded Places on Earth
Most Cruel Rulers Ever in History
Most Dangerous Animal in the World