honor

Honor quotes
Honor
1.

It is not a difficult matter to learn what it means to delight ourselves in the Lord. It is to live so as to please Him, to honor everything we find in His Word, to do everything the way He would like to have it done, and for Him.

- Coder, S. Maxwell
2.

The writer's only responsibility is to his art. He will be completely ruthless if he is a good one. He has a dream. Everything goes by the board: honor, pride, decency, security, happiness, all, to get the book written. If a writer has to rob his mother, he will not hesitate; the Ode on a Grecian Urn is worth any number of old ladies.

- Faulkner, William
3.

The louder he talked of his honor, the faster we counted our spoons.

- Ralph Waldo Emerson
4.

Fondly we think we honor merit then, When we but praise ourselves in other men.

- Pope, Alexander
5.

I grow daily to honor facts more and more, and theory less and less. A fact, it seems to me, is a great thing -- a sentence printed, if not by God, then at least by the Devil.

- Carlyle, Thomas
6.

IMPOSTOR n. A rival aspirant to public honors.

- Ambrose Bierce
7.

A man's vanity tells him what is honor, a man's conscience what is justice.

- Landor, Walter Savage
8.

Looking back over a decade one sees the ideal of a university become a myth, a vision, a meadow lark among the smoke stacks. Yet perhaps it is there at Princeton, only more elusive than under the skies of the Prussian Rhineland or Oxfordshire; or perhaps some men come upon it suddenly and possess it, while others wander forever outside. Even these seek in vain through middle age for any corner of the republic that preserves so much of what is fair, gracious, charming and honorable in American life.

9.

Don't hit at all if it is honorably possible to avoid hitting, but never hit soft.

- Roosevelt, Theodore
10.

Nominee. A modest gentleman shrinking from the distinction of private life and diligently seeking the honorable obscurity of public office.

- Bierce, Ambrose
11.

All honor to him who shall win the prize. The world has cried for a thousand years. But to him who tries and fails and dies, I give great honor and glory and tears.

- Miller, Joaquin
12.

Don't hit at all if it is honorably possible to avoid hitting; but never hit soft!

- Theodore Roosevelt
13.

Educating a son I should allow him no fairy tales and only a very few novels. This is to prevent him from having 1. the sense of romantic solitude (if he is worth anything he will develop a proper and useful solitude) which identification with the hero gives. 2. cant ideas of right and wrong, absurd systems of honor and morality which never will he be able completely to get rid of, 3. the attainment of ideals, of a priori desires, of a priori emotions. He should amuse himself with fact only: he will then not learn that if the weak younger son do or do not the magical honorable thing he will win the princess with hair like flax.

- Trilling, Lionel
14.

No cost is too heavy for the preservation of one's honor.

- Mahatma Gandhi
15.

One may survive distress, but not disgrace.

- Proverb, Scottish
16.

To be ambitious of true honor, of the true glory and perfection of our natures, is the very principle and incentive of virtue.

- Sidney, Sir Philip
17.

In days gone by, we were afraid of dying in dishonor or a state of sin. Nowadays, we are afraid of dying fools. Now the fact is that there is no Extreme Unction to absolve us of foolishness. We endure it here on earth as subjective eternity.

- Baudrillard, Jean
18.

Hereditary honors are a noble and a splendid treasure to descendants.

- Plato
19.

What office is there which involves more responsibility, which requires more qualifications, and which ought, therefore, to be more honorable, than that of teaching?

- Martineau, Harriet
20.

Dollars! All their cares, hopes, joys, affections, virtues, and associations seemed to be melted down into dollars. Whatever the chance contributions that fell into the slow cauldron of their talk, they made the gruel thick and slab with dollars. Men were weighed by their dollars, measures were gauged by their dollars; life was auctioned, appraised, put up, and knocked down for its dollars. The next respectable thing to dollars was any venture having their attainment for its end. The more of that worthless ballast, honor and fair-dealing, which any man cast overboard from the ship of his Good Nature and Good Intent, the more ample stowage-room he had for dollars. Make commerce one huge lie and mighty theft. Deface the banner of the nation for an idle rag; pollute it star by star; and cut out stripe by stripe as from the arm of a degraded soldier. Do anything for dollars! What is a flag to them!

- Dickens, Charles


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