art

Art quotes
Art
1.

Think of the earth as a living organism that is being attacked by billions of bacteria whose numbers double every forty years. Either the host dies, or the virus dies, or both die.

- Vidal, Gore
2.

It takes a lot of experience of life to see why some relationships last and others do not. But we do not have to wait for a crisis to get an idea of the future of a particular relationship. Our behavior in little every incidents tells us a great deal.

- Easwaran, Eknath
3.

An aged Christian, with the snow of time upon his head, may remind us that those points of earth are whitest which are nearest to heaven.

- Chapin, Edwin Hubbel
4.

Animals have these advantages over man: They have no theologians to instruct them, their funerals cost them nothing, and no one starts lawsuits over their wills.

- Voltaire
5.

An eclectic, if it mean anything, means this--one who in any branch of art or science refuses to acknowledge Bacon's great law, that "Nature is only conquered by obeying her;" who will not take a full and reverent view of the whole mass of facts with which he has to deal, and from them deducing the fundamental laws of his subject, obey them whithersoever they may lead; but who picks and chooses out of them just so many as may be pleasant to his private taste, and then constructs a partial system which differs from the essential ideas of Nature in proportion to the number of facts which he has determined to discard.

- Miscellanies. 1849.
6.

Men can be as original now as ever, if they had but the courage, even the insight. Heroic souls in old times had no more opportunities than we have; but they used them. There were daring deeds to be done then--are there none now? Sacrifices to be made--are there none now? Wrongs to be redrest--are there none now? Let any one set his heart in these days to do what is right, and nothing else; and it will not be long ere his brow is stamped with all that goes to make up the heroical expression--with noble indignation, noble self-restraint, great hopes, great sorrows; perhaps even with the print of the martyr's crown of thorns.

- Two Years Ago, chap. vii. 1856.
7.

In my own time there have been inventions of this sort, transparent windows tubes for diffusing warmth equally through all parts of a building short-hand, which has been carried to such a perfection that a writer can keep pace with the most rapid speaker. But the inventing of such things is drudgery for the lowest slaves; philosophy lies deeper. It is not her office to teach men how to use their hands. The object of her lessons is to form the soul.

- Seneca
8.

France is the only country where the money falls apart and you can't tear the toilet paper.

- Billy Wilder
9.

It makes no difference whom you vote for -- the two parties are really one party representing four percent of the people.

- Vidal, Gore
10.

That which is true of nations is true of individuals, of each separate human brother of the Son of man. Is there one young life ruined by its own folly--one young heart broken by its own wilfulness--or one older life fast losing the finer instincts, the nobler aims of youth, in the restlessness of covetousness, of fashion, of ambition? Is there one such poor soul over whom Christ does not grieve? One to whom, at some supreme crisis of their lives, He does not whisper--"Ah, beautiful organism--thou too art a thought of God--thou too, if thou wert but in harmony with thyself and God, a microcosmic City of God! Ah! that thou hadst known--even thou--at least in this thy day--the things which belong to thy peace"?

- MS. Sermon. 1874.
11.

God is closest to those with broken hearts.

- Proverb, Jewish
12.

You know that fiction, prose rather, is possibly the roughest trade of all in writing. You do not have the reference, the old important reference. You have the sheet of blank paper, the pencil, and the obligation to invent truer than things can be true. You have to take what is not palpable and make it completely palpable and also have it seem normal and so that it can become a part of experience of the person who reads it.

- Hemingway, Ernest
13.

I love those who can smile in trouble, who can gather strength from distress, and grow brave by reflection. 'Tis the business of little minds to shrink, but they whose heart is firm, and whose conscience approves their conduct, will pursue their principles unto death.

- Paine, Thomas
14.

DISCRIMINATE, v.i. To note the particulars in which one person or thing is, if possible, more objectionable than another.

- Ambrose Bierce
15.

There are two kinds of artists left: those who endorse Pepsi and those who simply won t.

- Lennox, Annie
16.

Accept failure as a normal part of living. View it as part of the process of exploring your world; make a note of its lessons and move on.

- Hobson, Tom
17.

Customs and convictions change; respectable people are the last to know, or to admit, the change, and the ones most offended by fresh reflections of the facts in the mirror of art.

- Updike, John
18.

The whole is simpler than the sum of its parts.

- Gibbs, Willard
19.

To cherish what remains of the Earth and to foster its renewal is our only legitimate hope of survival.

- Wendell Berry
20.

Every street has two sides, the shady side and the sunny. When two men shake hands and part, mark which of the two takes the sunny side; he will be the younger man of the two.

- Bulwer-Lytton, Edward G.


Test your English Language
Swami Vivekanand
Swimming Tips for Beginners
Sydney
Table Etiquettes
Tallest Building In The World
Tallest Dams In The World
Tarot Cards
Tatoo Designs
Tea Types
Tea Varieties
Precautions while using Internet Banking
Host a party
Healthy Foot
Vasant Panchami
Venomous Snakes
Greatest Technological Inventions of the Past 25 Years
Swimming Tips for Beginners
Stress Management Tips
Longest Rail Tunnels In the World
Celebration of Nag Panchami