argument

Word of the Day. Download App..
Argument quotes
Argument
1.

Discussion is an exchange of knowledge; argument an exchange of ignorance.

- Robert Quillen
2.

I learned an important lesson in the art of debate. Present your argument clearly, arm yourself with cutting wit and of course, bob and weave!

- Takayuki Ikkaku, Arisa Hosaka and Toshihiro Kawabata
3.

Truth often suffers more by the heat of its defenders, than from the arguments of its opposers.

- William Penn
4.

Testimony is like an arrow shot from a long-bow; its force depends on the strength of the hand that draws it. But argument is like an arrow from a cross-bow, which has equal force if drawn by a child or a man.

- Charles Boyle
5.

If you can't answer a man's argument, all is not lost; you can still call him vile names.

- Elbert Hubbard
6.

It is more noble by silence to avoid an injury than by argument to overcome it.

- Beaumont, Francis
7.

If you argue with a woman and win, you lose.

8.

There is a principle which is a bar against all information, which is proof against all arguments and which cannot fail to keep a man in everlasting ignorance-that principle is contempt prior to investigation.

- Paley, William
9.

Myself when young did eagerly frequent doctor and saint, and heard great argument about it and about: but evermore came out by the same door as in I went.

- Khayyam, Omar
10.

The argument of the strongest is always the best.

- La Fontaine, Jean De
11.

TRIAL, n. A formal inquiry designed to prove and put upon record the blameless characters of judges, advocates and jurors. In order to effect this purpose it is necessary to supply a contrast in the person of one who is called the defendant, the prisoner, or the accused. If the contrast is made sufficiently clear this person is made to undergo such an affliction as will give the virtuous gentlemen a comfortable sense of their immunity, added to that of their worth. In our day the accused is usually a human being, or a socialist, but in mediaeval times, animals, fishes, reptiles and insects were brought to trial. A beast that had taken human life, or practiced sorcery, was duly arrested, tried and, if condemned, put to death by the public executioner. Insects ravaging grain fields, orchards or vineyards were cited to appeal by counsel before a civil tribunal, and after testimony, argument and condemnation, if they continued _in contumaciam_ the matter was taken to a high ecclesiastical court, where they were solemnly excommunicated and anathematized. In a street of Toledo, some pigs that had wickedly run between the viceroy's legs, upsetting him, were arrested on a warrant, tried and punished. In Naples and ass was condemned to be burned at the stake, but the sentence appears not to have been executed. D'Addosio relates from the court records many trials of pigs, bulls, horses, cocks, dogs, goats, etc., greatly, it is believed, to the betterment of their conduct and morals. In 1451 a suit was brought against the leeches infesting some ponds about Berne, and the Bishop of Lausanne, instructed by the faculty of Heidelberg University, directed that some of "the aquatic worms" be brought before the local magistracy. This was done and the leeches, both present and absent, were ordered to leave the places that they had infested within three days on pain of incurring "the malediction of God." In the voluminous records of this _cause celebre_ nothing is found to show whether the offenders braved the punishment, or departed forthwith out of that inhospitable jurisdiction.

- Ambrose Bierce
12.

Rhetoric is nothing, but reason well dressed and argument put in order.

- Zamoiski, Jan
13.

The modern definition of "racist" is "someone who is winning an argument with a liberal

- Peter Brimelow
14.

Nations do not think, they only feel. They get their feelings at second hand through their temperaments, not their brains. A nation can be brought -- by force of circumstances, not argument -- to reconcile itself to any kind of government or religion that can be devised; in time it will fit itself to the required conditions; later it will prefer them and will fiercely fight for them.

- Twain, Mark
15.

The strongest argument for the un-materialistic character of American life is the fact that we tolerate conditions that are, from a negative point of view, intolerable. What the foreigner finds most objectionable in American life is its lack of basic comfort. No nation with any sense of material well-being would endure the food we eat, the cramped apartments we live in, the noise, the traffic, the crowded subways and buses. American life, in large cities, is a perpetual assault on the senses and the nerves; it is out of asceticism, out of unworldliness, precisely, that we bear it.

- Mccarthy, Mary
16.

Hear one side and you will be in the dark. Hear both and all will be clear.

- Haliburton, Thomas C.
17.

Never argue at the dinner table, for the one who is not hungry always gets the best of the argument.

- Whately, Richard
18.

The aim of argument, or of discussion, should not be victory, but progress.

- Joubert, Joseph
19.

You raise your voice when you should reinforce your argument.

- Samuel Johnson
20.

I do not think that anie language, be it whatsoever, is better able to utter all arguments, either with more pith, or greater planesse, then our English tung is, if the English utterer be as skilful in the matter, which he is to utter: as the foren utterer is.

- Richard Mulcaster


Test your English Language
Poker for Beginners
The Beautiful Brazil
Craziest Eating Contests From Around The World
Learn Swim
Myth about Accounting
Most Beautiful but Strange Flowers
Precautions while using X Rays
Teddy Day
Ten Ball Billiards
Terrifying