what to eat in dadra and nagar haveli

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What to Eat in Dadra and Nagar Haveli

The food in Dadra and Nagar Haveli is very strongly influenced by neighbouring state Gujarat.
41. Adadiya
Adadiya is famous Gujarati Winter special sweet. Adadiya is traditional Katchi and Kathiyawadi sweet. There are many ingredients in Adadiya which helps to keep body warm during winter.
42. Sutarfeni
Sutarfeni is a tasty sweet and peeling Indian dessert, Sutarfeni is very popular items in all our Gujarat and people can serve these sweet items in all festivals. Your guests will be impressed by you if you serve them this fine and delicate sweet. There are many varieties of sutarfeni like Gulab Sutarfeni, Kesar Sutarfeni and Dry Fruits Sutarfeni.Sutarfeni is mainly made during festivals. This is yummy in taste and can be prepared very easily. It is useful to all Ingredients for making Sutarfeni like sugar, water, and margarine. It also includes finely ground powder that is made from powdered pistachios, saffron (kesar) strands, powdered almonds (badam) and cardamom powder. After the sugar syrup is done and cooled, the katafi is covered with a damp cloth or paper towel. You can try out preparing yourself at home.
43. Kansar
Kansar is a sweet dessert dish from the Gujarat in Indian subcontinent, whose main ingredients are cracked wheat and jaggery. Serving Kansar to guests is considered a sign of respect in Gujarati culture, and the dish plays a part in traditional wedding ceremonies.
44. Halwasan
This dish is famous in the khambat area of Gujarat.
45. Malapua
Malapua is an pancake served as a dessert or a snack. which is also served to Jagannath in his Sakala Dhupa (Morning food served to the lord). It is During Paush Sankranti, Malapuas are prepared in Bengali homes. Malapuas along with mutton curry is served in many non-vegetarian Maithil homes during Holi. Malapua for Raja festivalWhat is known as malpua in West Bengal would be referred to as a type of halwa in Bangladesh. These are regional differences. Recipes vary between individuals and not necessarily regions.
46. Aamras
Aamras or Amras is the pulp of the tropical fruit Mango eaten in India. The pulp of a ripe fruit is extracted usually by hand and consumed along with Chapati. At times ghee and milk are added to the pulp to enhance its flavour. Sugar is also added to adjust the sweetness.A regional version of Amras is a popular dessert in Rajasthani cuisine and Marwari, Maharashtra, Gujarati homes, especially during festivities.Since the fruit is seasonal, being harvested at the end of summer, the need to preserve the fruit in the form of pulp has given rise to a moderately large Mango processing industry.
47. Basundi
Basundi is an Indian dessert mostly in Maharashtra, Gujarat and Karnataka. It is a sweetened dense milk made by boiling milk on low heat until the milk is reduced by half.Heavy cream may be added during the boiling process to hasten the thickening process. Once reduced, a little sugar, cardamom, Charoli and/or saffron are added. Industrially, only AMUL has so far launched Basundi in Tetra UHT Pack it can be poured, reheated or served chilled. Basundi should be preserved well after sugar is added. Sugar develops some acidity over a period of time. If it is excessive then it can curdle the Basundi. Some times after adding sugar one can cook it for some more time this gives a nice pink color to Basundi as sugar is also cooked in milk turning into a light caramel. Before adding sugar Basundi is thick but after adding it becomes again fluid. Stirring well prevents from Malai being formed on top and all guests (even late comers) can enjoy equally thick and plain Basundi. Basundi is served chilled, often garnished with slices of almonds and pistachios
48. Ghari
Ghari or Surati Ghari is a sweet dish from Gujarati cuisine, from the region of Surat. Ghari are made of puri batter, milk mawa , ghee and sugar - made into round shapes with sweet filling, to be consumed on Chandani Padva festival. It is also available in many varieties and flavours such as pistachio, almond-elachi and mawa.Ghari was prepared by the cooks of Tatya Tope to provide extra strength to the freedom fighter s soldiers. However, it began to be consumed during inauspicious occasions too, particularly by people of some castes in the crematorium for peace to the soul of the dead.
49. Sukhdi
Sukhdi is a sweet made from wheat flour and jaggery in ghee. Sukhdi is often consumed at weddings or on holidays.
50. Jalebi
Jalebi is a sweet popular in countries of the Indian Subcontinent such as India, Bangladesh, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka, and in many countries in the Middle East and North Africa, like Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Syria, Palestine, Lebanon, Egypt, Tunisia and Algeria. As well as several East African countries such as Zanzibar, Comoros and Mayotte. It is made by deep-frying a wheat flour (maida flour) batter in pretzel or circular shapes, which are then soaked in sugar syrup. They are particularly popular in the subcontinent during Ramadan and Diwali.


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