what to eat in bihar

Confusing Words in English Language. Free Reading..

What to Eat in Bihar

dishes which Bihar is famous for include Sattu Paratha, which are parathas stuffed.
31. Lathyrus sativus
Lathyrus sativus, is a legume (family Fabaceae) commonly grown for human consumption and livestock feed in Asia and East Africa. It is a particularly important crop in areas that are prone to drought and famine, and is thought of as an insurance crop as it produces reliable yields when all other crops fail. The seeds contain a neurotoxin that causes a neurodegenerative disease when the seeds are consumed as a primary protein source for a prolonged period.
32. Spinach
Spinach (Spinacia oleracea) is an edible flowering plant in the family of Amaranthaceae. It is native to central and southwestern Asia. It is an annual plant (rarely biennial), which grows to a height of up to 30 cm. Spinach may survive over winter in temperate regions. The leaves are alternate, simple, ovate to triangular-based, very variable in size from about 2
33. Chenopodium album
Though cultivated in some regions, the plant is elsewhere considered a weed. Common names include lambs quarters, melde, goosefoot and fat-hen, though the latter two are also applied to other species of the genus Chenopodium, for which reason it is often distinguished as white goosefoot. It is sometimes also called pigweed However, Pigweed is also a name for a few weeds in the family: Amaranthaceae, The Name pigweed is used for Amaranthus albus, Redroot pigweed and others.Chenopodium album is extensively cultivated and consumed in Northern India as a food crop, and in English texts it may be called by its Hindi name bathua or bathuwa It is called Pappukura in Telugu, Paruppukkirai in Tamil, Kaduoma in Kannada, Vastuccira in Malayalam, and Chakvit in Konkani.
34. Fenugreek
Fenugreek is an annual plant in the family Fabaceae with leaves consisting of three small obovate to oblong leaflets. It is cultivated worldwide as a semi-arid crop, and its seeds are a common ingredient in dishes from the Indian Subcontinent.
35. Chokha
It has been in wide use among Georgians from the 9th century until the 1920s, The trend of Chokha in Georgians still continue to occur as they see it as their proud cultural heritage they inherit till this day. France may be known for its berets, and Spain for its mantillas, but few national costumes are linked to as strong a sense of national pride as Georgias Chokhas. Nearly every Georgian household has photos of ancestors adorned in chokhas. Once a symbol of resistance to Bolshevik Russias 1921 takeover of an independent Georgia, the chokha has now come to represent a Georgia reborn, a country that revels in its cultural individuality. Increasingly worn by Georgian men at weddings and official functions, the eye-catching garb is finally experiencing a comeback in Georgia. The Chokha revival is taking place in parallel with a resurgence of interest in other mainstays of Georgian culture
36. Samosa
A samosa samoosa is a fried or baked pastry with savory filling, such as spiced potatoes, onions, peas, lentils and sometimes ground lamb, ground beef or ground chicken. They may or may not also contain pine nuts. The samosa originated in the Middle East (where it is known as sambosa) prior to the 10th century. They were introduced to South Asia (India, Pakistan) during the Muslim Delhi Sultanate when cooks from Middle East and Central Asia migrated to work in the kitchens of the Sultan and the nobility. Its size and consistency may vary, but typically it is distinctly triangular or tetrahedral in shape. Indian samosas are usually vegetarian, and often accompanied by a mint sauce or chutney.With its origins in Uttar Pradesh,they are a popular entree appetizer or snack in South Asia, Southeast Asia, Central Asia and Southwest Asia, the Arabian Peninsula, the Mediterranean, the Horn of Africa, North Africa and South Africa.
37. Kachori
Kachori is supposed to have originated in Uttar Pradesh or Rajasthan.[citation needed] In these states it is usually a round flattened ball made of fine flour filled with a stuffing of baked mixture of yellow moong dal or Urad Dal (crushed and washed horse beans), besan (crushed and washed gram flour), black pepper, red chili powder, salt and other spices. Additionally in Rajasthani cuisine, the Pyaaj Kachori (onion kachori) is very famous. Another form of Kachori which is famous in Rajasthan is the Mawa Kachori. It is a sweet dish which is dipped in sugar syrup. In Gujarat, it is usually a round ball made of flour and dough filled with a stuffing of yellow moong dal, black pepper, red chili powder, and ginger paste.In Delhi it is often served as a chaat. Also Delhi has another kind of kachori, called Khasta kachori or Raj Kachori.
38. Bhunjia
The Bhunjia are a scheduled tribe found in the state of Orissa in India. There homeland is the Sunabeda plateau which is roughly between 21? 25? North and 21? 30? north latitude and 82? 35? East longitude. It was a part of Khariar Zamindari, which formed the eastern and the southeastern region of Raipur district of Chhatisgarh division in Central Province till 1 April 1936, when it was transferred to Orissa on its creation. It is now in Komna block of Nuapada district in Orissa. Nearly 62 tribal groups are living in Orissa, out of which 10 tribal groups may be identified in Nuapada. The Bhunjias, a primitive tribe of Orissa, are found in Nuapada. Nuapada is considered as the homeland of the Bhunjias. 75 percent of the total population of this tribe lives here. They are living in the uphill range of Sunabeda plateau in Nuapada. According to the 1981 Census the population of Bhunjia was 7000 and now it must be around 10000. Accordingly 75 percent of populations i.e. about 7500 Bhunjias are living in Nuapada. According to the tribe, the term Bhunjia means growing out of land or origin from the earth.
39. Bhurta
Bhurta or bharta is a lightly fried mixture of mashed vegetables (chakata) in the cuisine of India, Bangladesh and Pakistan. An example of this is Baingan ka Bhurta.
40. Khaja
Khaja is a dessert of India. Refined wheat flour, sugar and oils are the chief ingredients of khaja. It is believed that, even 2000 years ago, Khajas were prepared in the southern side of the Gangetic Plains of Bihar. These areas which are home to khaja, once comprised the central part of Maurya and Gupta empires. Presently, Khajas are prepared and sold in the city of Patna, Gaya and several other places across the state of Bihar. Khajas of the Silao and Rajgir are known for their puffiness. Khajas have travelled to some other parts of India, including Andhra Pradesh and Odisha . Khaja of Kakinada is a coastal town of Andhra Pradesh. Where as khaja of Puri is too famous. At first, the butter is of wheat flour, mawa and oil. It is then deep fried until crisp. Then a sugar syrup is made which is known as Paga. The crisp croissants are then soaked in the sugar syrup until they absorb the sugar syrup. In Kakinada, Khaja is dry from outside and full of sugar syrup from inside and is juicy.


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