precautions while using shampoo

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Precautions while using Shampoo

Special warnings and precautions for using Shampoo.
31. India
In India, a variety of herbs and their extracts were used as shampoos. A very effective early shampoo was made by boiling Sapindus with dried Indian gooseberry (aamla) and a few other herbs, using the strained extract. Sapindus, also known as soapberries or soapnuts, is called Ksuna (Sanskrit: in ancient Indian texts and its fruit pulp contain saponins which are a natural surfactant. The extract of soapberries, a tropical tree widespread in India, creates a lather which Indian texts called phenaka (Sanskrit: It leaves the hair soft, shiny and manageable. Other products used for hair cleansing were shikakai (Acacia concinna), soapnuts (Sapindus), hibiscus flowers, ritha and arappu (Albizzia amara). Guru Nanak, a Sikh guru, made references to soapberry tree and soap in 16th century.
32. Indonesia
Early shampoos used in Indonesia were made from the husk and straw (merang) of rice. The husks and straws were burned into ash, and the ashes (which have alkaline properties) are mixed with water to form lather. The ashes and lather were scrubbed into the hair and rinsed out, leaving the hair clean, but very dry. Afterwards, coconut oil was applied to the hair in order to moisturize it.
33. Composition
Shampoo is generally made by combining a surfactant, most often sodium lauryl sulfate or sodium laureth sulfate, with a co surfactant, most often cocamidopropyl betaine in water to form a thick, viscous liquid. Other essential ingredients include salt (sodium chloride), which is used to adjust the viscosity, a preservative and fragrance.
34. Ingredient and functional claims
In the USA, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) mandates that shampoo containers accurately list ingredients on the products container. The government further regulates what shampoo manufacturers can and cannot claim as any associated benefit. Shampoo producers often use these regulations to challenge marketing claims made by competitors, helping to enforce these regulations. While the claims may be substantiated however, the testing methods and details of such claims are not as straightforward. For example, many products are purported to protect hair from damage due to ultraviolet radiation. While the ingredient responsible for this protection does block UV, it is not often present in a high enough concentration to be effective.
35. Health risks
A number of contact allergens are used as ingredients in shampoos, and contact allergy caused by shampoos is well known. Patch testing can identify ingredients to which patients are allergic, after which a physician can help the patient find a shampoo that is free of the ingredient to which they are allergic.
36. Specialized shampoos
Cosmetic companies have developed shampoos specifically for those who have dandruff. These contain fungicides such as ketoconazole, zinc pyrithione and selenium sulfide, which reduce loose dander by killing Malassezia furfur. Coal tar and salicylate derivatives are often used as well. Despite a big success of medicated shampoos there are also other alternatives for people who dislike using a lot of chemicals. Organic, natural shampoos can be a suitable alternative. These shampoos often use tea tree oil, essential oils and extracts.
37. Colored hair
Many companies have also developed color protection shampoos suitable for colored hair; many of these shampoos contain gentle cleansers. Dry shampoo is probably the hair styling product most likely to strike fear into the heart of a woman. We ve all heard this spray can work wonders, giving your hair volume, getting rid of oil, and even allowing you to skip days between hair washings. Let s face it, that last reason is a technological wonder that all women love! But when you throw in the threat of looking like you ve used George Washington s hair powder, most women won t even look at a can of dry shampoo.
38. Gluten free or wheat free
Many people suffer from eczema on their palms and their head. Some find that wheat or gluten (the protein found in many grains including wheat) is the cause, particularly if they are sensitive to this in food; e.g. celiac disease wheat allergy. Shampoo can often go into the mouth, particularly for children, so all individuals who are on gluten free diets may prefer to find a gluten free shampoo. Shampoo manufacturers are starting to recognize this and there are now gluten free and wheat free products available.
39. Baby
Shampoo for infants and young children is formulated so that it is less irritating and usually less prone to produce a stinging or burning sensation if it were to get into the eyes. For example, Johnsons Baby Shampoo advertises under the premise of No More Tears. This is accomplished by one or more of the following formulation strategies. 1 dilution, in case the product comes in contact with eyes after running off the top of the head with minimal further dilution. 2 adjusting pH to that of non stress tears, approximately 7, which may be a higher pH than that of shampoos which are pH adjusted for skin or hair effects, and lower than that of shampoo made of soap. 3 use of surfactants which, alone or in combination, are less irritating than those used in other shampoos.
40. Animal
Shampoo intended for animals may contain insecticides or other medications for treatment of skin conditions or parasite infestations such as fleas or mange. These must never be used on humans. While some human shampoos may be harmful when used on animals, any human haircare products that contain active ingredients or drugs (such as zinc in anti dandruff shampoos) are potentially toxic when ingested by animals. Special care must be taken not to use those products on pets. Cats are at particular risk due to their instinctive method of grooming their fur with their tongues. Shampoos that are especially designed to be used on pets, commonly dogs and cats, are normally intended to do more than just clean the pets coat or skin. Most of these shampoos contain ingredients which act differently and are meant to treat a skin condition or an allergy or to fight against fleas.


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